EYEBRIGHT EYE WASH

Eyebright is a wild plant native to Europe. It is a small downy, annual herb, common in meadows, pastures and other grassy areas of Europe and Western Asia. Many species are found in alpine or sub-alpine meadows where snow is common.

Eyebright herb relieves inflammation caused by colds, sinus infections, and allergies. A simple infusion in water of 1 oz of the herb to a pint of boiling water should be used and the eyes bathed three or four times a day. When there is much pain, use a warm infusion rather more frequently for inflamed eyes till the pain is removed. In ordinary cases the cold application is found sufficient.

Another remedy is to take bayberry bark, eyebright herb, goldenseal root, red raspberry leaves 1 part each and 1/8 part cayenne and make an infusion and bathe the eyes three to six times a day. You can also take this formula internally. If you make the formula into an alcohol tincture, you can take 15 drops internally or put 3-5 drops in an eyecup with boiling distilled water and allow it to cool before using as an eyewash.

This Herbal Eyewash Formula has been used to clear up cataracts and a heavy mucous film across the eyes. It has also been used to stop macular degeneration and to heal scar tissue left from a herpes infection. It also brightens the eye, removes foreign particles, and helps reduce glaucoma. It has helped remove floaters and stop sub retinal hemorrhage. Some people using this formula have regained their vision if they were nearsighted, farsighted, or even blind.

Donít be alarmed if the eyesight gets worse for the first few days of using this formula, because the toxins in the eye are being brought up to the surface so they can be removed from the body. You may also have various amounts of pus or mucus come out of the eyes as you are using the formula because the body is cleaning out the eye tissues. Make sure all elimination channels of the body such as the lower bowel, kidneys, liver, and skin are open so that the body can rid itself of the toxic materials that have built up in the eye tissues

Both infusions and decoctions made from herbs diluted with water may be used for external applications. You may dip a cloth in a full strength infusion, wring out the excess moisture and apply to the treatment area. This method is used to treat skin irritation, headaches, chest congestion or swelling from an injury. A compress can be made with a bandage or any clean cloth folded to form a pad. Soak the material in teas made from herbs, roots or essential oils. They can be hot or cold. Wrap over the area firmly ( but not so firm as to cut off circulation.

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